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Dish Of The Day: Currywurst

Dish of the day: currywurst

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Currywurst is a cultural classic. It's a German icon that deserves its legendary rock star status. The recipe combines three of the world's most adored ingredients – sausage, curry and tomato ketchup – and creates a salty, indulgent dish. Berlin even has a museum dedicated to the stuff, so you know it's good.

Steamed pork sausage is sliced and fried, drizzled with spiced ketchup and sprinkled with curry powder – and it's usually served with a mammoth portion of French fries or a generous chunk of bread. And there's so many great places to pick it up, from Bier's Kudamm 195 and Curry 73's classic versions to Curryhain's own vegan take on the classic.

Street food staple made good

The extra healthy lunch on Monday 😝😂😝 #lunch #food #foodporn #unhealthy #currywurst #curry73

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Hipsters have given currywurst various trendy twists, but its original form is still a staple of German street food stalls. It's popular all over Germany, but especially in Berlin, Hamburg and the Ruhr Area. Common variations include chopped onions and paprika.

If you get a spontaneous craving for something flavoursome and filling to sink your teeth into, nothing hits the spot like currywurst. It's such a loved dish,  it's no surprise that you can find it in classy restaurants now, too. Premium sausages are cooked to perfection, boasting complex herb blends, and homemade versions of the familiar curry sauce.

Where currywurst began

Currywurst's origins are humble as you might expect. Herta Heuwer, a housewife in Berlin, invented the dish in 1949, after she got the ingredients from British soldiers. She mixed together the ketchup and spices to pour over the grilled pork sausage. Frau Heuwer sold the food at a street stall in Charlottenburg, Berlin – and construction works who were rebuilding the devastated city loved it. At the height of its success, she was selling 10,000 currywurst per week – and now we eat 800 million currywursts in Germany every year.

Perhaps currywurst's ingredients are an odd and unforeseen match, but they've stood the test of time. Street food's recent resurgence has further highlighted currywurst's timeless appeal, and now it's popular all over the globe. You'll find it in food carts in New York, at festivals in rural England, and even in specialist boutiques in Tokyo. But we all know they can't compare to Germany's own sausages. They're the original, and the best.

Celebrity status

If you're after currywurst as it was meant to be eaten – hot and sticky and full of homemade charm – then Berlin's Bier Kudamm 195 is where you want to go. They specialise in currywurst, serving it up with their signature spicy sauce and all manner of sides. Add extra hot sauce, or slather your chips in mayo for a Belgian twist on the classic. Curry 73 offer a similar menu, but you can pick a beef or veal sausage instead of the standard pork – and their fries are cooked in cholesterol-free canola oil.

Healthy eaters need not despair, though – there's a currywurst for you too. Berlin's trendy Curryhain make sure everyone can enjoy this traditional dish, by serving up their own meat-free version. Get a vegan currywurst, complete with fresh fries and homemade curry sauce, for a lighter take on this classic.

Feel the need for some proper currywurst without leaving the house? Deliveroo will bring it right to your door.

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